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Obtain and Collect Guns and Firearms Legally

Just like any other weapon or any gun, collecting antique, old and historic and probably nonfunctional guns also require a special kind of license to make the act of collecting, transporting and selling guns legal. Let yourselves be reminded that these objects are or once are weapons. These are things that are still or were dangerous machines that are meant to take away peoples lives. So do not fret so much about how it seems to be a hassle for obtaining such licenses.

The license we are talking about is the Federal Firearms License. This license is important for making the gun business legal and regulated. The gun business also covers the transportation, trade, selling, and collection of guns or firearms. However, it is not just swift and easy to earn a Federal Firearm License. In fact, It has various type of license depending on the type of gun business you are involved. It also has several levels for each type of license depending on the depth of involvement in the gun business.

And of course, collecting antique and historic firearms has its own unique type of Federal Firearm License. The type 3 license will grant an individual the right to collect Curio and Relic firearms. So if you are planning to collect guns, be sure to collect only those guns that belong to the following criteria: the firearm or gun must be aged 50 years old, excluding gun replicas; Firearms that are recognized and certified by a federal museum that are considered to be historically valuable.

Women, Their Reasons for Gun Ownership, and What That Means for Your Business

Nearly 9 million firearm background checks were filed in the United States from January 2012 through the end of June 2012, according to the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). A topic discussed in many articles is the increase of women pursuing gun ownership. In fact, 43% of women report personally owning a gun in 2011, as compared to only 13% in 2005 (Saad; Carroll). With more women owning guns and more women interested in firearms in general, it is important that a gun store intentionally market to women, ensuring that they feel welcome and safe in what is traditionally a male dominated industry (Bestul; McCombie). Women have different views on and reasons for owning firearms. The following article will outline two of these views and potential marketing techniques for those ideals.

One very common reason for owning a gun is self-defense. Women who desire a gun for this reason may have varying levels of experience with firearms. For instance, it may be that she intends to buy the gun, place it unloaded in a closet and forget about it. She does not intend or expect to have to use it, but it provides a sense of peace by having it. At the same time, she is apprehensive and unprepared to ever use the weapon. It could be, on the other hand, that the woman who is looking to purchase is fairly familiar with guns, having grown up around them. She is fairly comfortable shooting the gun. On occasion she may practice shooting, but this is usually more to make sure the gun still works than to improve her skill (Blair). This woman is looking for a gun that functions easily and has low maintenance requirements. A woman with this view is likely already looking for a firearm; she just needs a reason to come to your business. Through your advertising, you must display knowledge, and the ability to instill self-confidence in these customers through proper firearms training, whether through willingness to give advice, offering her discounts on training and practice time if your store is equipped to do so, or to encourage her to pursue courses through a local facility. To help make these women comfortable in your store, the addition of a female employee to assist them with their decisions would be a wise business choice. Other options include: carrying feminine firearms and accessories (i.e. guns with color options, conceal carry accessories designed for women, firearms that are fitted to the female anatomy, in regards to both strength and build issues, etc.), displaying gender-neutral decorations in the store, and avoiding political propaganda and divisive conversations, as much as possible.

Another type of female consumer, who is generally rarer, is the avid shooter. She has likely been around guns all of her life, shoots with regularity, and has no qualms about firearms (Blair). This woman likely spends a lot of time in gun stores, and feels fairly comfortable regardless of decor or the gender of employees, although a female employee and neutral decor is still beneficial. However, care should be taken not to assume that she is inexperienced with firearms. Employees should be sure to treat her with respect and courteousness at all times, even before he or she is sure of how much experience that this customer has. This customer is not as likely to pursue pink firearms, but will generally lean towards the firearm that is better suited for the female anatomy (i.e. length of pull, grip and hammer placement suited for smaller hands, a balance between lightness and amount of recoil, adjustable fore grip distance, adjustable comb for cheek weld, telescopic butt stock, etc.). Be sure to keep a decent amount of stock that suits the female build. Also, stay knowledgeable and up to date on what firearms and accessories are helpful for women, and avoid anything that is just a gimmick. Ultimately, the prudent gun store business owner will be sure to treat all customers equally and with respect, regardless of any perceived attributes. In so doing, all persons will feel welcome in your store, increasing the potential customer base for your business.

Sources

Bestul, S. (2011). Selling Handguns to Women. SHOT Business, 19(2), 24.

Blair, M., & Hyatt, E. M. (1995). The Marketing of Guns to Women: Factors Influencing Gun-Related Attitudes and Gun Ownership by Women. Journal Of Public Policy & Marketing, 14(1), 117-127.

Carroll, Joseph. (2005). Gun Ownership and Use in America. Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/20098/Gun-Ownership-Use-America.aspx.

McCombie, B. (2011). The Untapped Opportunity. SHOT Business, 19(5), 42-47.

Saad, Lydia. (2011). Self-Reported Gun Ownership in U.S. Is Highest Since 1993. Gallup. Retrieved from http://www.gallup.com/poll/150353/Self-Reported-Gun-Ownership-Highest-1993.aspx.

Cheap Paintball Gun – Online Auctions

Do your research

Buying online is easy and saves you time, but you should never cut corners on your product research before you decide to buy a paintball gun or a paintball gun accessory. You hear so many unhappy stories of people who bought a paintball gun or accessory in haste which did not actually meet their needs, or was not compatible with their other paintball gear. You need to know about a products features and reputation, whether the manufacturer is still in business and can service your paintball gun, and it all comes down to thorough research. There is no substitute for proper research and it should not be rushed. You will regret it if you do.

Finding an online paintball gun auction

A quick search in Google should give you a list of paintball gun auction sites. A good place to start is eBay. You will need to register with the paintball gun auction site before you can take part in auctions. Make sure you read the auction site’s rules and be aware of any fees or commissions for which you will be charged.

The photograph

Buyers should check that the paintball gun in the photograph is the paintball gun that the seller says it is. If the seller has not posted a photograph, then ask to see a photograph of the actual paintball gun or paintball gun accessory being sold. Do not be satisfied with a picture of the product taken from the manufacturer’s website.

Sellers should take a photograph of the paintball gun or accessory since a photograph will give you a much better chance of making a sale. You want the buyer to see a good photo showing all the paintball gun’s features, including upgrades, so take a number of photos, experiment with background and lighting and see which looks best online.

You are entering a binding agreement

An agreement to buy or sell a paintball gun or paintball gun accessories through an online auction amounts to a binding contract, but this will not stop some people refusing to go through with the deal after the agreement has been made.

The auction site will have rules governing transactions and failure to complete on an agreed deal, and you need to be aware of these and have recourse to them if something goes wrong. Sites vary in the degree to which they become involved when a party fails to complete, but you should always report those that flout the rules to the auction site. In most cases people who break the rules are prohibited from taking part in further auctions.

In practice, there is usually not much more you can do if a party agrees to buy or sell a paintball gun or accessory but does not complete on the deal.

Check out the buyer or seller’s online reputation

However, before you start bidding for a paintball gun, check out the other party’s online reputation at the auction site to find out what other people say about them. On eBay, buyers and sellers are rated and you can even contact people who have previously done business with the buyer or seller. If you see some negative comments, then seek further clarification from the comment maker as to what the problem was with the buyer or seller. Then form your own opinion as to whether you can trust the buyer or seller.

Keep a record of all communications

If you send e-mails to the other party then keep a record of these. Likewise, if you speak to them on the phone, make a note right away of what was said and date the note. Such e-mails and notes are evidence of what was agreed between the parties and these will be useful if you have to refer the matter to the auction site if the other party does not complete the deal.

I have found that you can tell a fair amount about a paintball gun seller from how they respond to questions, and how quickly they respond. Send off an e-mail with a few product and payment questions and then see how the seller responds. If the response is evasive or misleading or rude, then trust your gut instinct and do not contract with the seller.

Price, payment and delivery

As a seller, many auction sites will allow you to put a reserve price on your paintball gun or paintball gun accessory so that it cannot be sold for a lower price.

Common forms of payment are credit cards or PayPal, but each seller will have their own requirements, of which a buyer should be aware. It is always a good idea to e-mail to confirm how payment is to be made.

If you are selling, make sure you get payment confirmed before you despatch the goods.

Buyers should be aware that con artists sometimes pose as sellers in order to get buyers to send money transfers, for example ‘wiring’ money through Western Union, so be very suspicious of anyone who insists on payment in this manner.

Shipping costs will in most cases be additional to the price, and they should be quoted separately. If none are quoted, then ask. Also ask when you can expect to receive the paintball gun.