U.S. Manufacturers of Gun Safes and a Closer Look at AMSEC Gun Safes and Cannon Gun Safes

When shopping for manufacturers of gun lockers and safes, it’s a good practice to stick with manufacturers who have to answer to higher standards to remain competitive on the market. In the U.S.A., that often means providing quality on a local level. American-made products usually have to adhere to a higher standard in order to remain viable. Here is an alphabetical list of some U.S. manufacturers of gun safes, and what to expect.

American Security Safes Otherwise known as “AMSEC,” the AMSEC gun safes have enjoyed a solid reputation amongst gun owners for decades, the company began in 1948. Being produced in California, arguably the strictest state in the union when it comes to regulatory standards of safe production (e.g.: “CA DOJ Approved” symbol for gun safes), AMSEC knows their trade. They made a name for themselves by becoming the first safe manufacturer to receive the UL’s TL-15 and TL-30 classification for anti-theft devices on their safes. They were also the first to create round door vaults – an innovative design that deters burglary. American Security Safes found the high price of these round doors was enough to send them to the drawing board to create a cost-effective, albeit secure, square and rectangular door design. They are driven to provide quality at a reasonable price.

Cannon Safes Cannon has been in the safe-manufacturing business over 4 decades. Their mission has been to give affordable security options, and have backed their products with one of the best warranties on the market. A Cannon gun safe is backed by their lifetime warranty. Canon offers a lifetime replacement guarantee, and will pay for a safe tech to open your safe after an attempted burglary, fire or other disaster. They will also pay for onsite repair, or for the shipping charges to send the safe to and from their factory in the case of any of these disastrous events. The reason being, Cannon gun safes are a permanent investment in the company’s eyes. As to security rating, their safes are UL RSC certified against break-in, and Intertek-ETL has certified their fire rating from 30 minutes on some models to 90 minutes on their Safari models.

Liberty Liberty is a Utah-based company, a newcomer to the industry by industry standards (1988), but nonetheless they have used the best business practices to make a significant name for themselves. Their safes are rated from the UL, Underwriter’s Lab. They quickly worked their way to a leading position of full-sized home safes in the U.S. with good working ethics and purchasing National Security Safe, Co. in ’97. They also designed door technology with their “HiSecurity Composite” doors, which layered fireboard, hardened plate-steel, and steel for added fire and security quality. Their bolt works is also a patented system, and Liberty introduced an innovative shelf system that was adjustable.

Spotlight: American Security Safes

As stated previously, AMSEC gun safes are some of the best made, with a history to show for it. They developed a composite construction, combining hard-plate along with concrete, which was then and remains a winning design to thwart fire as well as theft. Due to their innovative designs and focus on anti-theft construction, the UL tested and found AMSEC gun safes worthy of the anti-theft ratings TL-15 and TL-30, which remains one of the best ratings on the residential safe market. The rating means that the safes in question can withstand a concerted tool-attack by burglars for 15 or 30 minutes, and the U.S. Department of Justice statistical data shows that most burglary attacks against safes average about 7 minutes. In other words, these safes will buy the necessary time it takes to protect your investments.

American Security Safes has been around since 1948, started by Glenn Hall. In the beginning, Glenn only began with a welding machine and lathe, and wanted to build a secure safe that would withstand burglary attempts. AMSEC gun safes are still designed with this focus in mind, and through the decades they have made significant strides in engineering to keep ahead of the game.

One such design was the round door. These were very effective deterrents against theft, but carried a high production cost. Nonetheless, this feature was a design innovation that kept AMSEC ahead of the competition, and their design was a standard against which others were measured.

As the demand for safes grew, American Security wanted to make their safes more affordable for the common man. The door was redesigned to a square shape to accommodate, while maintaining a high level of security for the consumer. This required other changes to the bolt works in order to keep the standard of security high, this all took place in the 1960’s. During the 90’s, AMSEC was the very first company (in the U.S.) to receive the UL’s burglar rating (see above), which was ahead of the competition. In fact, very few manufacturers bother with this high degree of security, keeping AMSEC’s concern for burglary ahead of most manufacturers to this day, with few exceptions.

American Security Safes is still pushing their production to a self-imposed higher standard. Another example is how they subject their electronic locks the a standard called, “Mil 0202-Method 106,” which is a military-grade standard to check for electronics reliability.

As of date, AMSEC gun safes are produced using the best in welding construction practices, and the company is churning out around 600k safes/year, from Fontana, CA. When you buy AMSEC gun safes, you’ll be treated to affordable quality and scratch-resistant interiors, with gun racks, shelves and plenty of space. They also offer a fantastic “No Cost” warranty – no cost for shipping, repair, replacement in the event of a burglary attempt or fire.

Spotlight: Cannon Gun Safes

Cannon gun safes are produced by Cannon Safes, whose motto is, “Nothing protects like a Cannon.” They have been in business over 4 decades, and have been making innovation their game plan. They specialize in creating design break-throughs, and back all of it up with a strong “for life” guarantee. Like AMSEC, they have a lifetime warranty that covers the shipping, parts and labor or replacement for a safe under theft attempt, flooding or fire damage.

Cannon offers 5 main lines of safes: Traditional, Cannon, Patriot, American Eagle and Safari. They do also offer Home and Office safes, which are more along the line of personal-sized safes as opposed to the larger gun locker-style safes. Cannon is also making a line of wall safes.

Beginning with the Traditional Series, and there are a handful of safes in this line, are beautiful to look at. Elegance may not be what you think of when considering a safe, but there you have it. This class of safe offers rounded edges on the exterior, which reportedly offers greater strength. The interior is top-notch, with oak facing on the shelves, upholstered surfaces, and even interior lighting options and a dehumidifier option as well. Their fire rating is ETL-rated at 1200 F for 90 minutes. The door handle is also beautiful: 5 spokes, protected with a better-than-required Type 1 UL rated electronic lock (industrial grade). For security, the safe has multiple relockers in case of theft attempt, and a bolt-down option as well.

Their Safari Series, which is split between a more economical “Serengeti” and the top-of-the-spectrum “Dangerous Game” series, is the latest design of the Cannon gun safes. The Dangerous Game Cannon gun safe comes in several selections. Boasting gorgeous pin striping and a painted bust of a water buffalo, the Dangerous Game series is essentially the Traditional (the top of the line), but with a Safari design to it. The edges are rounded, like the Traditional, and the interior has velour-lined shelving for an added bit of luxury.

Other features of Cannon gun safes that are nice touches (may not be available on all models): the interior LED lighting, which comes on as the door is opened (like a refrigerator) and shuts off when you close the door, is a great touch! So is the dehumidifier rod that you can opt for, though you can usually purchase them after-market. Of course, you can just use desiccant packs, but the cord-opening is a nice touch to keep mildew down. The Cannon “Tru-Rack” system is one of the only racking options on the market that allows you to rack as many guns as you’re being advertised, so their 36-gun safes can actually hold 36 long guns.

The Serengeti is fire-rated for 60 minutes at 1200 F by the ETL, while the Dangerous Game is rated at 90 minutes. The Serengeti’s door is a composite 1.5″, the Dangerous Game is 2.25″ composite, and both have double steel construction of either 10 or 12 gauge steel with fire protection. Another difference is the capacity, where the Serengeti is smaller, the Dangerous Game goes up to a 36-gun capacity.

No matter what product you are buying from American Security Safes or Cannon Gun Safes, you’ll be sure that your investment will be protected by excellent design, reputations, and warranties that should ensure you you’re making a wise decision.

Responsible Gun Storage by Finding the Best Gun Safe Features

Owning a gun for personal and business use always entails responsible handling and safekeeping from its users. Owning a gun safe is one of the important factors to consider upon gun ownership. When purchasing a gun safe it is highly empirical to know the best features to look for in order to ensure that you get the quality storage safe where to keep your gun.

Buying a gun safe of good quality is much less expensive than spending for a replacement once your gun gets stolen. There are several stores who sell gun safes of different quality and the choice is left to the buyer to choose the one that fits their budget and meets their quality requirements. One should note that a gun safe that is made of thicker steel always offers the highest quality and better protection for your guns.

With countless gun stores selling gun safes of different brands and quality how will you get a gun safe that comes with better quality and assurance of storing your guns safely and more reliably? Knowing the following important factors that contribute to the quality of a gun safe feature will help you make better decisions when buying a gun safe.

1. Gun Safe Size and Weight

Recommendations from the experts on the ideal size and weight of a gun safe will be an interior vertical clearance of 58″ and a loaded weight of 750 lbs. A 30″ barrel rifle for instance is about 52″ long. An extra space will be required thus a 58″ interior height is more ideal. This is the recommended minimum interior vertical clearance by experts. The common width sizes are between 36″ to 40″ which provides enough space for a 16-gun rotary rack on one side of the gun safe with an added shelving unit on the other. These measurements provide an efficient and handy storage of a gun safe.

A 2000 lbs gun safe provides better security but requires professional installation in your home that can be a bit expensive. An alternative option is to go for a 750 lbs gun safe which provides a sturdy foundation that is hard to move while giving enough size and can resist from being tipped over.

2. Shell Strength and Wall Thickness

This is an important feature of a gun safe as this help prevents your guns from being toasted during a fire. A gun safe should be one with good external strength to prevent the breaking down of its components such as when heated on a fire. Good quality gun safes shells are constructed with continuous wells instead in stitches.

It is notable that steel is very expensive and many gun owners find it more practical to compromise the external shielding of a gun safe to get manageable weight and to spend a reasonable cost. Since most home related gun thieves employ a snatch and grab tactics of stealing guns instead of using cutting tools and gadgets this may seem a practical choice for a gun safe buyer.

3. Locking Device

Experts prefer the feature of rotary combination dial locks as a more reliable locking device for gun safes. They remain to be durable and often times with less hassles to operate than its digital clock counterparts. Cheap electronic locks are known to have its key pad internal to easily wear out. When choosing to buy a dial lock you should look for a UL group II certification feature and a UL Type 1 certification for digital lock gun safes.

Being able to find these good quality features from a gun safe will give you a guaranteed reliable gun safe to buy where you can store your gun safely.

Guns and Children

Several years ago, I, (as a legislator), received a booklet entitled, Children, Youth, and Gun Violence: Issues and Ideas.

The opening statement that this booklet was: “Each year more than 20,000 people under 20 are killed or injured by guns in the United States.” Almost immediately following that was the comment, “But too often, gun policy debates focus on the rights of adults to own guns and pay scant attention to issues of children’s safety.”

I thought, “Oh, oh, here we go again-an argument for more gun control.”

Certainly, none of us wants to see children die by the gun, either by accident or by deliberate acts. But, that, in itself, is not any rationale for more gun control laws.

This booklet advocated educating parents to protect their children from gun violence, “either by choosing not to keep guns in the home, or by storing guns locked, unloaded, and separate from ammunition.”

When I was a young shaver, my father kept a shotgun in his little cubicle of a home office, (he actually was a laborer). We were taught NEVER to touch that gun. And from the punishments that had been meted out to us in the past for far less serious infractions, we knew he meant business, and we never did touch it!

However, if we wanted to go with him hunting, or be with him target practicing, we were allowed. In our family, we children, were never encouraged to have our own guns, though my oldest brother knew how to shoot a 22. In those days, many parents, including my own, frowned on pointing even toy guns at another person, though the enforcement wasn’t quite as strict.

This report went on to talk more about restricting access to guns by children, and then did take up the issue of “Educational Interventions to Reduce Youth Gun Injury and Violence.” They listed several programs to educate children about guns.

One was the Eddie Eagle Gun Safety Program. This is a program advocated by the National Rifle Association, (NRA). I have heard gun advocates talk about this program many times. I have listened to how effective it can be. Many schools around the United States offer this program to students.

But many more schools refuse to allow students to participate in this program. Their attitude, in some cases, is that allowing this program might be viewed as support for the NRA.

The Eddie Eagle Program is taught to students from prekindergarten through grade 6. There is a motivational “big book” for the younger children, activity books for grades 2 & 3, and 4 -6, with a 7 minute video, reward stickers, parent letter, etc. “The message is: If you see a gun, stop! Don’t touch. Leave the area. Tell an adult.”

Gun advocates tout how effective this program is.

This publication’s evaluation: “NRA cites testimonials and reductions in accidental death rates between 1991 and 1992…but no formal evaluations have been published.”

Another program is “Straight Talk about Risks”, (STAR), from the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence. (You remember Jim Brady was the aide to President Reagan who was severely wounded in the presidential assassination attempt.) Certainly that program ought to get an A+ by the critics?

The evaluation: “Inconsistent and inconclusive effections on attitudes and no change in behaviors. No evaluation has been published.” (If no evaluation has been published, I’m not sure where this publication got the information to create their evaluation?’)

It is interesting to watch how those interested in promoting their agenda `use’ or `bend’ the information to bolster their cause. This booklet pointed out that “Parents are arguably the best-positioned adults to monitor children’s behavior and keep them safe from exposure to guns in the home and in the community.”

Their take on the responsible adult is one who allows no guns in the house, or one who stores the gun, unloaded, and not in close proximity to ammunition. If a person has chosen to own a gun for personal protection against intruders, etc., how effective is having an unloaded gun `at the ready’ – or for that matter, one with a safety lock? Is not the most effective control, educating the child?

The article lists a series of “Specific Policy Options” to ensure safety for the youth of America:

“Require background checks on all gun sales, including private sales, to prevent the illegal sale of guns to minors” That’s interesting. You would require background checks simply to check someone’s age? When someone who appears to be under 21 years old goes into a liquor store, does the store clerk make him/her fill out a background check form, and make the customer wait until the information comes back in a few minutes or a few days? I don’t think so. A check on the person’s driver’s license usually suffices! So what is the real purpose of the background check? Certainly not the age aspect.

And as I’m sure you’ve heard time and time again, the person who is likely to fail a background check, is not usually the person who is attempting to buy a gun at a gun shop or a gun show.

Here’s another: This was listed under what state legislatures could do. “Require handgun owners to obtain a safety license and to register their handguns with local law enforcement, similar to the system in place for automobiles, (my italics), to deter gun owners from transferring their weapons to youth.”

“Limit handgun sales to one per month, to reduce `straw purchases’ from gun stores.”

When I first was elected to the N.H. House of Representatives, some 16 years ago, I would probably have listed myself as a fairly staunch supporter of gun control… probably leaning to ban a major portion of the types of guns sold.

Since then, I have sat through many hearings on gun control legislation, and listened to both sides. I have had almost a complete turn around on the issue.

My issue is not the usual Constitutional issue that many supporters of gun owner rights espouse. But, in the greatest philosophical sense, perhaps, I do believe that `guns don’t kill’, people do. Sure, sometimes in severe domestic disputes, because there is a gun around, someone may get shot and killed. And, yes, children do get killed accidentally.

But people also die in cars every day. And why? Carelessness, inattention, etc. But we don’t ban them!

I really believe that the main issue in gun control is education-that is, for the ordinary citizen. There is no education about gun control for the criminal.

The criminal is not likely to go shopping in legitimate gun shops for his weapon. Why would he? He is purchasing it to engage in an illegal and criminal act!

Common sense, and real cooperation on the part of our school systems would go a long ways in stopping accidental shooting of our youth. I’m in favor of mandatory education about guns in our schools. Not mandatory education in how to use them, but how to act safely around them.

If someone chooses to allow their child to handle a weapon, perhaps there should be mandatory training on how to use it safely.

We could engage in banning a lot of things that are dangerous to us. Have you ever seen the statistics on how many people choke to death on a bone in a restaurant? Perhaps we need a law to prohibit the sale of any chicken that is not boneless?

Let’s tackle the real core of the problem, instead of passing law after law, banning this thing and that thing. Of course, that will mean we will have to assume more personal responsibility.