U.S. Manufacturers of Gun Safes and a Closer Look at AMSEC Gun Safes and Cannon Gun Safes

When shopping for manufacturers of gun lockers and safes, it’s a good practice to stick with manufacturers who have to answer to higher standards to remain competitive on the market. In the U.S.A., that often means providing quality on a local level. American-made products usually have to adhere to a higher standard in order to remain viable. Here is an alphabetical list of some U.S. manufacturers of gun safes, and what to expect.

American Security Safes Otherwise known as “AMSEC,” the AMSEC gun safes have enjoyed a solid reputation amongst gun owners for decades, the company began in 1948. Being produced in California, arguably the strictest state in the union when it comes to regulatory standards of safe production (e.g.: “CA DOJ Approved” symbol for gun safes), AMSEC knows their trade. They made a name for themselves by becoming the first safe manufacturer to receive the UL’s TL-15 and TL-30 classification for anti-theft devices on their safes. They were also the first to create round door vaults – an innovative design that deters burglary. American Security Safes found the high price of these round doors was enough to send them to the drawing board to create a cost-effective, albeit secure, square and rectangular door design. They are driven to provide quality at a reasonable price.

Cannon Safes Cannon has been in the safe-manufacturing business over 4 decades. Their mission has been to give affordable security options, and have backed their products with one of the best warranties on the market. A Cannon gun safe is backed by their lifetime warranty. Canon offers a lifetime replacement guarantee, and will pay for a safe tech to open your safe after an attempted burglary, fire or other disaster. They will also pay for onsite repair, or for the shipping charges to send the safe to and from their factory in the case of any of these disastrous events. The reason being, Cannon gun safes are a permanent investment in the company’s eyes. As to security rating, their safes are UL RSC certified against break-in, and Intertek-ETL has certified their fire rating from 30 minutes on some models to 90 minutes on their Safari models.

Liberty Liberty is a Utah-based company, a newcomer to the industry by industry standards (1988), but nonetheless they have used the best business practices to make a significant name for themselves. Their safes are rated from the UL, Underwriter’s Lab. They quickly worked their way to a leading position of full-sized home safes in the U.S. with good working ethics and purchasing National Security Safe, Co. in ’97. They also designed door technology with their “HiSecurity Composite” doors, which layered fireboard, hardened plate-steel, and steel for added fire and security quality. Their bolt works is also a patented system, and Liberty introduced an innovative shelf system that was adjustable.

Spotlight: American Security Safes

As stated previously, AMSEC gun safes are some of the best made, with a history to show for it. They developed a composite construction, combining hard-plate along with concrete, which was then and remains a winning design to thwart fire as well as theft. Due to their innovative designs and focus on anti-theft construction, the UL tested and found AMSEC gun safes worthy of the anti-theft ratings TL-15 and TL-30, which remains one of the best ratings on the residential safe market. The rating means that the safes in question can withstand a concerted tool-attack by burglars for 15 or 30 minutes, and the U.S. Department of Justice statistical data shows that most burglary attacks against safes average about 7 minutes. In other words, these safes will buy the necessary time it takes to protect your investments.

American Security Safes has been around since 1948, started by Glenn Hall. In the beginning, Glenn only began with a welding machine and lathe, and wanted to build a secure safe that would withstand burglary attempts. AMSEC gun safes are still designed with this focus in mind, and through the decades they have made significant strides in engineering to keep ahead of the game.

One such design was the round door. These were very effective deterrents against theft, but carried a high production cost. Nonetheless, this feature was a design innovation that kept AMSEC ahead of the competition, and their design was a standard against which others were measured.

As the demand for safes grew, American Security wanted to make their safes more affordable for the common man. The door was redesigned to a square shape to accommodate, while maintaining a high level of security for the consumer. This required other changes to the bolt works in order to keep the standard of security high, this all took place in the 1960’s. During the 90’s, AMSEC was the very first company (in the U.S.) to receive the UL’s burglar rating (see above), which was ahead of the competition. In fact, very few manufacturers bother with this high degree of security, keeping AMSEC’s concern for burglary ahead of most manufacturers to this day, with few exceptions.

American Security Safes is still pushing their production to a self-imposed higher standard. Another example is how they subject their electronic locks the a standard called, “Mil 0202-Method 106,” which is a military-grade standard to check for electronics reliability.

As of date, AMSEC gun safes are produced using the best in welding construction practices, and the company is churning out around 600k safes/year, from Fontana, CA. When you buy AMSEC gun safes, you’ll be treated to affordable quality and scratch-resistant interiors, with gun racks, shelves and plenty of space. They also offer a fantastic “No Cost” warranty – no cost for shipping, repair, replacement in the event of a burglary attempt or fire.

Spotlight: Cannon Gun Safes

Cannon gun safes are produced by Cannon Safes, whose motto is, “Nothing protects like a Cannon.” They have been in business over 4 decades, and have been making innovation their game plan. They specialize in creating design break-throughs, and back all of it up with a strong “for life” guarantee. Like AMSEC, they have a lifetime warranty that covers the shipping, parts and labor or replacement for a safe under theft attempt, flooding or fire damage.

Cannon offers 5 main lines of safes: Traditional, Cannon, Patriot, American Eagle and Safari. They do also offer Home and Office safes, which are more along the line of personal-sized safes as opposed to the larger gun locker-style safes. Cannon is also making a line of wall safes.

Beginning with the Traditional Series, and there are a handful of safes in this line, are beautiful to look at. Elegance may not be what you think of when considering a safe, but there you have it. This class of safe offers rounded edges on the exterior, which reportedly offers greater strength. The interior is top-notch, with oak facing on the shelves, upholstered surfaces, and even interior lighting options and a dehumidifier option as well. Their fire rating is ETL-rated at 1200 F for 90 minutes. The door handle is also beautiful: 5 spokes, protected with a better-than-required Type 1 UL rated electronic lock (industrial grade). For security, the safe has multiple relockers in case of theft attempt, and a bolt-down option as well.

Their Safari Series, which is split between a more economical “Serengeti” and the top-of-the-spectrum “Dangerous Game” series, is the latest design of the Cannon gun safes. The Dangerous Game Cannon gun safe comes in several selections. Boasting gorgeous pin striping and a painted bust of a water buffalo, the Dangerous Game series is essentially the Traditional (the top of the line), but with a Safari design to it. The edges are rounded, like the Traditional, and the interior has velour-lined shelving for an added bit of luxury.

Other features of Cannon gun safes that are nice touches (may not be available on all models): the interior LED lighting, which comes on as the door is opened (like a refrigerator) and shuts off when you close the door, is a great touch! So is the dehumidifier rod that you can opt for, though you can usually purchase them after-market. Of course, you can just use desiccant packs, but the cord-opening is a nice touch to keep mildew down. The Cannon “Tru-Rack” system is one of the only racking options on the market that allows you to rack as many guns as you’re being advertised, so their 36-gun safes can actually hold 36 long guns.

The Serengeti is fire-rated for 60 minutes at 1200 F by the ETL, while the Dangerous Game is rated at 90 minutes. The Serengeti’s door is a composite 1.5″, the Dangerous Game is 2.25″ composite, and both have double steel construction of either 10 or 12 gauge steel with fire protection. Another difference is the capacity, where the Serengeti is smaller, the Dangerous Game goes up to a 36-gun capacity.

No matter what product you are buying from American Security Safes or Cannon Gun Safes, you’ll be sure that your investment will be protected by excellent design, reputations, and warranties that should ensure you you’re making a wise decision.

Just Say No To A National Gun Registry

I was having a discussion with a friend today who, although very liberal on most issues, is somewhat middle of the road when it comes to gun control. He is not against concealed carry, but does favor far more background checks – especially on sales from a private individual to private individual.

He is a bit surprised that I am against this. “Why?”, he asked.

First, let me preface my reasoning with a little information about me. I am not an anarchist. I am not a doomsday prepper. I do not believe we are due for a revolution, certainly not within my lifetime. I like having SOME government (don’t tell my anti-statist friends though). All of these beliefs being so, I must admit that I do fear for the generations that come after my death (I do hope to have at least another 40 years, which would get me into my 80s).

So back to my friend. Why do I disagree with him? Well, it is simple. Background checks on every sale, specifically private individual to private individual, would lead to a nationwide gun registry. I am very much against having one of these.

My friend countered, very proudly I might add, that we must register our cars. Why not our guns? This is simple. Nowhere in the constitution does it guarantee the right to keep and own cars. We all caved on the licensing of cars and drivers about a hundred years ago.

Our founding fathers specifically put verbiage in the constitution allowing us to keep and bear arms. There are different interpretations as to what they meant, but I believe at least part of their reasoning was so that we could protect ourselves from a tyrannical government or those who wish to do us harm.

Do I believe that our government is tyrannical? Well, not quite yet. We are still the most free nation on earth. I do not like to path our country is on, but I do not feel it is to late to right the ship.

Having a national gun registry would lead to forced gun buy-backs or even confiscation during some future crisis (either natural or man-made). Having our abilities to defend ourselves from criminals and/or government listed in a database would be sharing information that is way too personal.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Government is good at making us believe that being safer (their definition) is well worth giving up a few rights. Forcing people everywhere to register their private, constitutionally protected guns is a bad idea.

I can foresee that guns would even get tied to addresses where their owners no longer live. What if you moved into a home where the previous occupants had a number of guns registered and the police came looking for those folks? We all know that police, most of them being great people, do make mistakes when their adrenaline levels are too high. Would you want your home getting shot up because the previous residents had guns listed in the registry?

During a so-called “state of emergency” you can bet some local, state or national governments would make a move to take any weapons that did not reside in the hands of government personnel. It has already happened. See the video below.

I believe it is none of the government’s business if I own a gun (or guns). Yes, I have to do the same background check as anyone else when I buy a new gun. But do you think that having a national registry would keep guns out of the hands of people who could not pass a background check? Not a chance. I believe you would see a lot of gun owners reporting their guns stolen in order to sell their guns to whomever they desire – just as they can now.

When times get bad, whose doors are agents of the government (police or military ) going to be knocking down when they go on their gun collection binges? I’ll tell you – the door’s that are on the addresses contained in the gun registry.

While we do not currently have a government that kicks in doors and gives gas showers or firing squads to people they do not like, we do not know what our government will look like in 50 or 100 years. I want my children and grandchildren to be able to defend themselves from both a tyrannical government or a homicidal maniac (I suppose they could be one and the same though).

Starting a national gun registry is the first step to taking guns from people the government does not want possessing guns. Currently these people are felons and those with mental problems. Who might these future gunless people be? People of particular political parties? People of certain economic classes? People of certain religions? It has all happened throughout world history. We pretend to be the enlightened Americans but we have factions that want to take all our freedoms and give all the power to the government just like dictators of past and present we have all heard of.

How does this happen? We have to look at it from two avenues. First the gradual loss of gun rights for everybody through new “minor” restrictive gun laws. Second, the complete loss of gun rights for specific groups of people the government has targeted. Imagine a candle burning at both ends. As one end burns, more and more of the governments enemies are specifically forbidden to have guns. As the other end burns, more and more of the general population are getting the remainder of their gun rights taken away as well. When the flames meet in the middle we are left with no guns for anybody, and we have a government with nothing to fear. That is the nightmare of the slippery slope.

You think this has never happened?

1. In 1929, the Soviet Union established gun control. From 1929 to 1953, about 20 million dissidents, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated
2. In 1911, Turkey established gun control. From 1915 to 1917, 1.5 million Armenians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.
3. Germany established gun control in 1938 and from 1939 to 1945, a total of 13 million Jews and others who were unable to defend themselves were rounded up and exterminated.
4. China established gun control in 1935. From 1948 to 1952, 20 million political dissidents, unable to defend themselves were rounded up and exterminated
5. Guatemala established gun control in 1964. From 1964 to 1981, 100,000 Mayan Indians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.
6. Uganda established gun control in 1970. From 1971 to 1979, 300,000 Christians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.
7. Cambodia established gun control in 1956. From 1975 to 1977, one million educated people, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and exterminated.

TOTALS: Defenseless people rounded up and exterminated in the 20th Century because of gun control: about 56 million.

But that could never happen in the United States, you say. Well, it has. Just go back to what New Orleans police were doing during Hurricane Katrina. A national gun registry is an unwelcome intrusion into our personal defenses. Even if this database was not open to the public, millions of people that work in government would have access to it. Do you really think you could keep all those people from snooping on their neighbors?

I believe establishing a national gun registry is a major step on the slippery slope to the elimination of gun rights. You can guarantee that a required field on a background check for person to person gun transfers will include one for the gun’s serial number. Do not fall for the “this will make us all safer” nonsense. It will not. It is just another step on the road to the elimination of our gun rights.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-taU9d26wT4

Daisy BB Guns – A Marketing Strategy That Became A Business

Daisy BB Guns — Doesn’t that name Daisy sound odd for a company that manufactures airsoft guns, airguns, ammo and other accessories? It makes a person wonder how the company got its name.

What Came Before The Name Daisy

Daisy Outdoor Products, the world’s oldest manufacturer of airguns, ammo and accessories, didn’t begin making guns and ammo until 1886. Neither was it named Daisy. This company was once known as Plymouth Iron Windmill Company, which manufactures windmills in Plymouth, Michigan. At that time, the windmill industry was starting to decline and the company needed to figure out new ways of attracting customers.

A New Invention Called Daisy

The answer that they were looking for came in 1886 when Clarence Hamilton, a Plymouth inventor, created a device that could fire a lead ball using compressed air. He brought his invention to the windmill company and asked Lewis Cass Hough, the president of the firm at that time, to give it a try. After firing his first shot, he was very impressed by the contraption. “Boy, that’s a Daisy!” He exclaimed. Since then, it got stuck with that name.

A Marketing Strategy That Took Over the Company

In order to attract more customers, the company gave away a Daisy BB gun to every farmer who purchased a windmill. Because this toy is a novelty item, it became a hit after some time. The demand for this toy prompted the company to make Daisy BB guns instead of windmills. On January 26, 1895, the company’s board of directors finally decided to change the name of the company to Daisy Manufacturing Company, Inc.

After Daisy BB Guns became a major part of a youth’s life. Even though the company was quite well-known, it had to fend off some competitors like Bulls Eye, Dewey, Hero, Dandy and Atlas. At present, these brands no longer exist because they disappeared as soon as they were introduced in the public. Daisy BB guns survived this competition, continuously improving on their products as time went by.

Although Daisy BB guns were very famous in 1939, they were slowly overshadowed by the newer models that have flooded the market. Now, most kids use Automatic Electric Guns made by Tokyo Marui, Classical Army, KJ Works and other popular brands. Even though these brands have dominated the market, Daisy BB guns continue to survive in the market by creating new products and keeping them within the reach of their young consumers. As a matter of fact, the prices of their BB guns are quite low. They also give their customers quite a package. Each gun comes with a lot of goodies like paper targets, ammunition and a pop-up target trap.

Overall, Daisy BB guns are quite good. At 400 FPS, the BB’s fired by this gun can go very far. The weight of Daisy BB guns resembles the real thing. And, the mag doesn’t fall out when the gun is hit in a vertical motion. Because of their low prices and fantastic quality, Daisy BB guns will stay in the market for a longer time. What was once a marketing strategy became a business that has lasted for more than one hundred years.